How to fix a Krups XN2001 Nespresso machine

Click here to see some amazing Latte ArtMaybe the title of this post should read “how to open a Krups XN2001 Nespresso machine”. The Krups XN2001 is almost identical to the newer XN2002 and XN2003. While the XN2003 has normal Torx screws, Krups was a bit more “protective” when they built the XN2001. It has screws that can not be gripped by any screwdriver. Still, there is an easy trick you can use to get headless screws out of any machine.

My Krups XN2001 Nespresso maker has been working fine for the past few years. I descale it almost monthly with very cheap vinegar, but otherwise it needs no maintenance. Just after I repaired my free Aeroccino, the power button of the Krups XN2001 started to fail. It was hard to turn the machine on, like there was a bad contact.

When I tried to open the Krups XN2001, I noticed these funny looking screws, which looked more like nails. After I discovered that these were actually normal screws, I needed to figure out how to get to the ones at the bottom.

Yes, it's a screw, not a nail! No Dremel in the world could reach those...

I took the Nespresso machine to a hardware store I frequently visit, and talked to a new hire there. I showed him the machine and he took off on a rant about how I should not open it, that it was dangerous, and it would void the warranty. I told him it was a five year old machine and it was for fun. Just when he got irritated and told me “doesn’t matter, you can’t open it”, a colleague of him overheard our conversation. He looked at the new hire, smiled, and while pointing at me said “but he can”.

A few laughs and a short discussion later, it turned out that they did not have tools that would fit or grip the headless screws. I went into “MacGyver mode” and got an aluminum rod that fit nicely on top of the screw head without touching the plastics of the case, and grabbed a tube of industrial strength superglue.

At home, I cut the rod into a few shorter bushings, and used the lathe to make them nice and flat. I carved a slot on the other end of each bushing with a dremel tool. Then, I carefully superglued the bushings onto the screws without touching the plastic, and let them settle for a few minutes.

Super Glue and a bushing. Note the slot for the screwdriver. Removed screw with the bushing glued to it.

After the glue set, it was very easy to use a normal screwdriver to get the screws out. I took the screws with the glued bushings back to the hardware store to show them what I did and got me some new philips head screws with matching size.

Once you open it, you can see how simple this machine is. There’s not much that can break, and parts look like they can be easily replaced. Instead of just cleaning the contacts in the button, I decided to go a little further and replaced the existing ones. I had to cut away some placeholders for the old pushbuttons, and drill a hole to hold the green led which tells you what the machine is doing.

All the electronics. Not much to it, really. I also replaced the "dispense" button The repaired Aeroccino and the repaired Nespresso happily together.

As you can see my Krups XN2001 now looks a bit “steampunked” but it works like a charm!

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34 Responses to How to fix a Krups XN2001 Nespresso machine

  1. Chris L says:

    A bit more info on opening and repairing Nespresso machines is here:

    http://maultech.com/chrislott/blog/20100627_nespresso.html

  2. nd says:

    Nice. I just took a 6mm double screw [it is in fact a long screw-nut] shape its inside with Pliers and little hammer… in 10 min i had my D190 completely naked. thanks for the spirit!

  3. Bram says:

    Hello,
    Just looked at your Krups XN2001 repair. That’s exactly what I want to do. Lookes great. Removed allready the on/off switch and added a toggle switch. The other, temperature or warming up switch, I want to change as well with a toggle switch. I looked at your pictures. You have added a seperate light (green) to the housing. The three white wires from the little printed circuit board go to the swich (2) and one to the light. My question is where does that orange wire go to? Can you help?
    Look forward to your reply.
    Bram.
    Netherlands.

    • rolfje says:

      If you look carefully at the printed circuit board, you see that the LED and the switch share one connection. Because my LED is farther away, I needed an extra wire to connect the switch and the LED the same way as on the board.

      By the way I would not recommend toggle switches, they probably will not work. You’ll want to use push buttons.

      • Bram says:

        I installed a push button and a seperate LED light as per your instructions and the machine works again like a charm. I left the power on/off toggle swich in place. Is there any reason why you do not recommend a toggle switch? I bought two push buttons so I have one standing by, just in case. The whole operation costed me 2.80 Euro. Thanks for your wonderfull assistence.

      • rolfje says:

        I recommend a push button because the original button is also a push button, not a toggle switch.

  4. chris says:

    thank you! i hope you stil read this.. ive got machine apart at the moment. the power button was my first replacement. now my coffee one is acting up. I took it apart and the rubber button fell apart (making it useless now). So, im trying to replace the coffee button and there are three wires instead of two. how does the whole led thing work? Ive tried desoldering the ones i thought were the button wires and attaching a button like the other one (i dont care about the led at this point, id rather just have the coffee button working first). So, Ive got three wires. what do I with them?maybe unsolder the led one as well so as not to confuse the machine? i thought for certain the led wire was the one soldered directly onto a path leading to the bulb on the circuit. ugh, any advice would be great! my main goal is to have coffee again in the morning asap haha

  5. rolfje says:

    Same advice I gave bram: Look at the board. The first white wite goes to one end of the switch. The second white wire goes to the switch and the led (this is probably the ground wire), and the third white wire goes just to one end of the LED. Make pictures. Mark the LED, as it will not work if you connect it the other way around. Unsolder the marked wires and the marked LED. Drill a hole for the LED, and connect everything up exactly the same as it was on the circuit board. The LED and the switch should both work perfectly.

  6. chris says:

    Thank you for your response. I managed to mark and identify the wires last night. Now its working but without the LED (i just feel if its warm or not, then i know its on).
    So, the fourth wire is something you ran off of one part of the new button. And that’s just electronics wire, any particular strength? And sorry one more question, did you reuse the LED or buy a new one? Im trying to figure out how you separated the LED from the board. Thank you again!

    • rolfje says:

      It’s the original LED, with a soldering iron it’s easy to remove from the board. The orange wire is one that I had lying around, just a general electronics wire, no particular strength. An LED like this takes about 20mA, any wire will do really.

  7. Fred says:

    Thanks Mr R, the trick is indeed getting the thing open. Thought the were rivets or something! The screws came out easily with thin pliers. Machine is working again. If it stops again, I’ll replace the push buttons
    Thanks again
    Fred

  8. larry says:

    HELP WITH TROUBLESHOOTING – After taking apart and cleaning and checking all electronic components, I still get the blinking lights 3 times. Then, I measure the following resistance with a multimeter – NTC = 93.5 k Ohms, T167 Fuse = 0.2 Ohms, Thermoblock = 44.9 Ohms, T 128 Fuse = 0.3 Ohms, Pump Motor = 311 k Ohms.
    Are these normal? Or is the Pump Motor burnt up? If not, I guess I need to buy a new electronic main board? Any ideas on where and how much it costs?
    Lost without expresso

    • rolfje says:

      Hi Larry, I only replaced the buttons, I never checked any other parts in the machine, so I don’t know if the things you are measuring are expected values. The pump motor feels like a high resistance but I don’t know what type of pump it is and if it should be like that.

      You say you get the blinking light 3 times. Is that after plugging in, or turning on? After blinking, does the light go out or stay on? Does the base of the machine get warm (it should)?

      • larry says:

        Thanks for the reply. As soon as I turn the switch to ‘on’ both lights flash 3 times pauses for a second, then flashes 3 more times and continues to repeat this cycle with no way of getting it to reset. Nothing turns on or heats up. According to the troubleshooting manual I was able to get my hands on this means a component failure and then gives you a list of what components to check and in what order – the only problem it does not tell you exactly how to check.

        Still lost without expresso

    • tomalamix says:

      The T128 e T167 Fuse must be near 0ohm (0 – 50 ohm).
      The Thermoblock is around 50ohm in two cases ive tested and both are working
      The NTC is 100Kohm at ambient temperature around 25ยบ C. It will increase a lot as the temperature rises.
      The pump i didnt measure so i dont know if its ok or not, sorry.

    • Enzo says:

      Larry, if you want to fix your nespresso machine, replace the two blue “squared” capacitors on the board with others with the EXACTLY same values. Pay attention to use capacitor X2 type!
      I had the same problem and I fixed successfully.
      Look my directions on:

      http://maultech.com/chrislott/blog/20100627_nespresso.html

  9. chas R says:

    I used an aluminum spacer and vise grips to create an oval driver. A hacksaw blade across the opposite side allows the spacer to accept a flat head screw driver. I took the panels off and ran a cycle to find a source of the leak. Evidence pointed me to the water heater inlet hose and a blown rubber O ring. Couldn’t find the O ring locally so I used silicon gasket cement to “roll my own”. No more leaks. Thanks for hosting this column.

  10. Paul says:

    Great post. It helped me a lot to know that these strange metal points were actually just screws. I looked in my shed to find a small metal tube of the right size and hammered the end to an oval form. The screws are not tightened very strong, so no problem getting them out and in again.
    I had the same problem with a faulty on/off switch. I just cleaned the contact and it works again.

  11. Jorgen says:

    Thx for your discription on how to open the krups machine. I found you through Google. We experienced the same problem. I want to tell you That i opened the machine by using a pair of pointed pliers. Your blog was very usefull in this case. Many thanks again.

    Jorgen

  12. Markus Heidt says:

    Graphite spray!
    When I first repaired a machine, I replaced the switsch as well.
    But then I got the hint to use graphite spray in the back of the silicon buttons. Remember not to spray into the LED button but use a stick or something else to cover it.
    Works like a charm.

  13. Jonathan says:

    The screws are called TORX for reference.

  14. Michael says:

    love your post. The screws are not called Torx. They are called Pan Head oval security screws. Very nice tutorial btw. I came across this because i need to take apart my Maestria d500 very soon

  15. Sasha Lutsky says:

    hello.
    thank you for your manual.
    could you help me please to find the silicon button for nespresso essenza?
    i can not find it on the net…
    thank you.
    sasha.

  16. Claudio says:

    Hi all and thanks in advance for your help.

    I managed to fix the faulty power button by cleaning its back after opening the machine with a spare IKEA spacer screw :D

    I still have a problem: when pressing the coffee button, the machine starts brewing coffee but then it tends to quit after less than a second and it powers off.
    I can power it back on so I can make coffee few drops at a time, but obvioulsy it’s not ideal.

    Sometimes, like once every 10 times, it can regularly make coffee, but certainly there is no way to make 2 coffees in a row.

    Extra info:
    – the machine has been descaled with no success in this issue;
    – if I press the coffee button more deeply, it switches off even earlier;
    – the coffee button has been cleaned in the same way as the power button (cotton stick with alcohol).

    I do not think that replacing the blue capacitors, as per Enzo’s recommendation, would help in this case as the machine gets ready indeed.
    Also, the fact that the machine powers off makes me think it’s not a mechanical issue – e.g. back of the button still dirty – or else it should not power off!

    Does that sound to you any pressure/temp sensor kicking in?

    • rolfje says:

      If it just quits maybe the brewing button makes contact again (second press stops brewing). But you say it powers down, which is quite different. Maybe the spacing on the power button became close after cleaning it, and the vibration of the machine causes it to make contact. A heat sensor can also be at fault, as you say you can not make two coffees in a row. What doesn’t add up is that if you press harder on the coffee button, it switches off earlier. That takes us back to that button again.

      Can you run it without the covers on, and take the two buttons out? If you can brew coffee without the rubber on te buttons, then the buttons are the problem. If not, I’d look for a faulty thermo sensor but I have no idea where that would be.

      • Claudio says:

        Thanks Rolfjie.

        Along other tests, I tried what you recommended here as well before you commented, but for some reason I could not add comments to… my comments if someone else hadn’t commented yet :)
        (Sorry for the repetitions!)

        I got to the conclusion that there were multiple concurrent reasons for the fault and it was time to replace the machine, after 5 years of excellent services.

        In the end I purchased a new one.

  17. Imad Jamil says:

    Hi All,

    I have the same Nespresso machine that stopped working since few days. I opened it and noticed that the little blue capacitor shown in one of the photos above is melted! Now i know that this is the issue, but the problem is that i don’t know the value of that capacitor :(
    If you can tell me what’s the value written on the capacitor in your machine i will be able to fix mine :)

    Thank you in advance!
    Imad

  18. Rolf says:

    Hi all,
    I just managed to replace the red button without removing any of the oval screws. How? Just remove the lever arm.. Then “split” the top of the machine by using a screwdriver. Both the side panels can easily be forced outwards with the base still fixed. The resulting access is sufficient to remove the next internal piece and subsequently to replace the button.
    Great succes!!
    Rolf.

  19. Stef says:

    Hi,

    About the Claudio Wednesday 2014-05-07 problem:

    I encountered the same problem and here is my story:

    First I checked the functionality of the pump, connected it directly to the mains, it was OK
    Then I loosened the in and out of the heater and checked if the flow was not disturbed, caused by insufficient descaling. No apparent problem there. The temperature sensor also was working well as the blinking of the green led moved to steady green when the temperature level was met. Very hot indeed when touching accidentally by your finger!
    So what could be the reason of powering off when asking the machine to start the pump? The electronic module who did not succeed to swich the mains to the pump due to the amount of current it needs. Aging of one or more of the electronic components (capacitors maybe)?
    I decided to take another solution and did not touch to the electronics. I removed the green button and replaced it by a on-off switch to apply the mains directly to the pump. The green led was dismounted and placed through a small hole drilled in the front.

    That did the trick! I only have to wait until the green blinking stops, then I start the pump. Otherwise I get a brew which is cold or lukewarm.

    Stef

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